Planting Tips For Wet Springs

We are currently in the midst of one of the coldest and wettest springs in my 14 years of farming. As such we have been behind on a number of field tasks.

Here are some of the strategies that I’ve found helpful:

ENSURE ADEQUATE SOIL PREPARATION

some bed prep is better than none

Some ground preparation is better than none. Minor problems can always be smoothed over later.

MINIMIZE FIELD WORK WHEN GROUND IS WET

Soil moisture

A boot sinking 4″ into the soil is borderline dry for this year.

AVOID PLANTING INTO WEEDY AREAS

Under wet conditions, you should properly identify weed pressure. Under current conditions, the following is not considered weed pressure:

Weed pressure 1

This qualifies:

Weed pressure 2

In fact, can you identify what is crop and what is not?

In such situations, some form of intervention may be warranted.

Weed Pressure 3

That’s right, it was a tiny tomatillo plant!

BE PRECISE

Precision is important

USE APPROPRIATE TOOLS

tools

BE SATISFIED WITH A JOB WELL DONE

Done!

And with that, the last of our seed tomatoes and tomatillos are planted. Only a few more peppers to go!

I hope you too have found ways to cope with your spring calamities.

About these ads

8 responses to “Planting Tips For Wet Springs

  1. Your post makes me feel much better about our mucky fields and tiny plants, which look exactly like yours. MERCI mille fois!

  2. Will Bonsall

    Sounds like you’re even wetter than here; good luck!

    • Hopefully we get the 4 days of sun that is supposed to start on Tuesday!

      (and just maybe the 60% chance of showers tomorrow won’t actually hit)

      Thanks for luck,
      Dan

  3. I’m only thanking the rain for washing most of the aphids off my kale (actually that might have been the ladybugs, of which I have seen tons of larvae this year) but I think our raised beds saved us as well! Three sunny days in a row so far, is that a new record? In any case, we’re in it with you for better or worse, but I can’t imagine how frustrating it must be to see hard work washed away and to have to keep out of the field for so long.

    • We’re pretty flat so nothing’s washed away – the worst is how little crops are growing in the overcast cold water.

      May your aphids stay gone!

      Dan

  4. What a difference from last year! Should have put down the holding pond last year… would have filled up for sure… At least cruciferous flea beetle damage was short lived. Onward to the solanaceous one.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s